Read more about the article Bernard Dahlgren
Bernard Dahlgren's grave at West Laurel Hill Cemetery. He was originally buried at Gloria Dei.

Bernard Dahlgren

This stone commemorates Bernard Ulrick Dahlgren, although his body no longer rests here. His remains, with those of his wife Martha and their infant son Washington, now lie in West Laurel Hill Cemetery.

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Read more about the article Isaac V. Culin
For most of his adult life, Issac V. Culin made his living as a tailor, residing and working in the neighborhood of Southwark.

Isaac V. Culin

Descendants of Isaac V. Culin trace their lineage to Johan van Cöln, an early European settler who arrived on the Delaware around 1662. For most of his adult life, Issac made his living as a tailor, residing and working in the neighborhood of Southwark.

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Read more about the article Jacob Jackson: A Navy Man In The War Of 1812
A portrait of Jacob Jackson. From the Gloria Dei Church archives.

Jacob Jackson: A Navy Man In The War Of 1812

Jacob Jackson, whose body rests near those of his wife Catharine and several of their children, was a U.S. Navy veteran of the War of 1812. He was an active supporter of Gloria Dei (Old Swedes’) Church, elected as a member of the vestry in 1842.

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Read more about the article Sven’s Woods: Bringing More Wildlife To Gloria Dei
The passenger pigeon was a dominant bird species in the Philadelphia area two centuries ago. Plate 23 in Volume 1 of The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and Bahamas by Mark Catesby and George Edwards published in 1754.

Sven’s Woods: Bringing More Wildlife To Gloria Dei

By Michael Schreiber

The proposal to restore a portion of land at Gloria Dei (Old Swedes’) Church in Philadelphia to help attract wildlife is very timely. Its status as a National Historical Park and location within a big city can help make Gloria Dei a prominent example of ecological land management others can copy.

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A Peach Of A Botanist

By Amy Grant

Many local residents may not realize Queen Village is actually older than the City of Philadelphia. “Philadelphia’s First Neighborhood” was settled by Swedish immigrants in 1654, 28 years before William Penn founded Pennsylvania.

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Jenny Lind

By Michael Schreiber

Jenny Lind was the first international superstar of the musical world. The frenzy over her visit to the United States in 1850 even surpassed that of the “British Invasion” of the Beatles a century later. Yet those who met the “Swedish Nightingale” described her as being incredibly modest and generous. She gave large sums of money to charities and the poor, and regularly gave free concerts at Swedish churches in America—including one at Gloria Dei (Old Swedes’ Church) in Queen Village.

Lind’s visit to this country was arranged by master showman Phineas T. Barnum. He offered Lind the unheard-of sum of $1000 for 150 concerts, plus a share of the profits. Barnum was at his newly opened museum in Philadelphia in February 1850 when he received word that Jenny Lind had agreed to his terms. But the showman had difficulty raising the capital for Lind’s tour. At the last minute, a Philadelphia minister, the Rev. Abel C. Thomas, lent Barnum the final $5000 that was needed.

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Captain Joseph Blewer

Rev. Carl Magnus Wrangel married Joseph Blewer and Sarah Lindenmeyer at Gloria Dei Church on September 26, 1759.

Joseph Blewer being a ship captain assumed an active role in the War of Independence. In November 1775 Captain Blewer was in Cambridge, Massachusetts and was directed by General George Washington to deliver a letter to John Hancock, President of the Continental Congress. In June 1776 Benjamin Franklin and others including Captain Blewer met at Carpenter’s Hall creating the Committee of the City, Council of Safety.

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George Ord, Ship Chandler

George Ord, Sr. was born in England in May, 1741 and settled in Southwark. He married Rebecca Lindmeyer on January 17, 1767. They lived in a three-story brick house with a large garden at 784 South Front Street, between Catharine and Clymer Streets. Prior to settling in Philadelphia he was a successful ship captain.

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Captain Lodge Colton, Master’s Mate

By Bob Josuweit

Being a riverfront Church, Gloria Dei has a rich history that involves many people who were involved with maritime related occupations. Captain Lodge Colton was no exception. At the age of 14 he became a mariner on the clipper barque “James Cornor.” (sp. Corner?) He served the CSN being appointed in Baltimore, Maryland. Lodge Colton was a Master’s Mate on the CSS Rappahannch in 1864 and the CSS Shanandoah in 1865. The CSS Shanandoah crossed the equator four times. On April 16, 1868 he was married in Baltimore to Marian Watts. The next year they moved to Philadelphia. Although his service took him to ports of call around the world, they maintained sittings at Gloria Dei from 1870 on. In 1874 they settled in New Orleans. Captain Colton’s ship sailed between New Orleans and Havana, Cuba. In 1880 he became a captain in the Ward Line, making voyages between New York, Cuba, and Mexico. He moved to New York and became a senior captain in 1887.

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John C. Hunterson, Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient

John C. Hunterson was born on August 4, 1841 in Philadelphia.

He entered the Union Army on July 23, 1861, where he was mustered in as a Private in Company B, 3rd Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry. He was awarded the CMOH for his bravery June 5, 1862, a few days after the Battle of Fair Oaks. His citation reads “While under fire, between the lines of the two armies, voluntarily gave up his own horse to an engineer officer whom he was accompanying on a reconnaissance and whose horse had been killed, thus enabling the officer to escape with valuable papers in his possession.”

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