William Irvine, Brigadier General, U.S. Congressman

William Irvine (1741-1804) graduated from Dublin University, became a physician, and served as a surgeon in the British Navy before immigrating to Pennsylvania in 1763. He resumed practicing medicine and was a Delegate to Pennsylvania’s anti-Stamp Act conventions in 1764 and 1766. Irvine also took part in Pennsylvania’s conventions held to consider independence in 1774 and 1775.

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Read more about the article Jacob Jackson: A Navy Man In The War Of 1812
A portrait of Jacob Jackson. From the Gloria Dei Church archives.

Jacob Jackson: A Navy Man In The War Of 1812

Jacob Jackson, whose body rests near those of his wife Catharine and several of their children, was a U.S. Navy veteran of the War of 1812. He was an active supporter of Gloria Dei (Old Swedes’) Church, elected as a member of the vestry in 1842.

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Susan Atmore and Fausto Gonzalez

Susan E. Atmore passed away suddenly on April 15 th, 2019. Susan was born February 4 th, 1943 to Joseph and Lavinia Lyons of Philadelphia, PA. She graduated from Southern High School, she was proud of her roots from South Philly. For over 30 years, Susan loved taking care of her old farm house in Media, PA with her husband. She made everyone who entered the home part of the family with her warm and inviting way. Spending time with her daughters and her grandchildren in her home and her Sea Isle City beach house was the highlight of her life. Susan is survived by her husband of fifty-one years Thomas (Tom) Atmore, daughters Melissa (Michael) O’Brien and Noelle (Matthew) Bamonte, granddaughters Meg, Molly and Michaela O’Brien and grandsons Matt and Tommy Bamonte, brother Joseph (Rosalie) Lyons and sister Lavinia (Anthony) DiDio and all her nieces and nephews.Relatives and Friends may call Friday April 19, from 6-8 pm in the J. Nelson Rigby Funeral Home, 1 W. Baltimore Avenue Media. Prayer service at 8 pm. Interment Private – From Obituary.com.

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Neills Laickan

Nils Lycon died at ‘Pour Island’ on December 4, 1721 at the age of 55, survived by his wife and six daughters.*

On January 12, 1691. ‘Nicholas Nellson’ asked the Board of Property to replace his meadow north of Philadelphia because it was being drowned by a new mill. Otherwise, however, he was known as Nils Lycon (by its many spellings), the eldest son of Peter Nilsson Lycon. He lived on a tract adjoining Shackamaxon known as ‘Poor Island,’ granted to his father in 1680, surveyed in 1683, and conveyed to him before his father’s death.

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Captain Joseph Blewer

Rev. Carl Magnus Wrangel married Joseph Blewer and Sarah Lindenmeyer at Gloria Dei Church on September 26, 1759.

Joseph Blewer being a ship captain assumed an active role in the War of Independence. In November 1775 Captain Blewer was in Cambridge, Massachusetts and was directed by General George Washington to deliver a letter to John Hancock, President of the Continental Congress. In June 1776 Benjamin Franklin and others including Captain Blewer met at Carpenter’s Hall creating the Committee of the City, Council of Safety.

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Sarah J. Fosque

“Mrs. Sarah J. Fosque, aged seventy-five years, died suddenly at the Virginia Home for Incurables Sunday morning about 5 o’clock.  She was subject to heart attacks and this disease as the cause of her demise.  A few moments before she died she rang the bell for a nurse and told her when she came that she wanted the doctor at once.  Before he could get down the steps she was dead.

The remains were shipped yesterday to Philadelphia, where she was born and had a number of relatives.  She married Captain William F. Fosque, of Accomac County, and survived him several years.  She possessed considerable property at the time of her death and was by no means a charity patient at home.  She was a staunch but very liberal minded Episcopalian, frequently, when in better health, attending Methodist camp-meetings and taking great interest in the work of all denominations.  She thought Easter the choicest day on the calendar and this was the day of her death.”

Source: “Obituary.” Richmond Times 14 April 1903: 2. Print.

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Reverend John Craig Roak

John Craig Roak served as Gloria Dei’s rector from 1933 to 1972. Reverend Roak guided his congregation through the end of the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War and all but the very end of the United States’ involvement in Viet Nam. Social changes during his tenure at Gloria Dei included the Great Migration of African Americans from the South, the Civil Rights Movement, the rekindled Women’s Movement that began in the 1960’s, President Lyndon Johnson’s experiment with the Great Society, and increasing immigration from “new” parts of the world, especially Southeastern Asia and Latin America.

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Gloria Campisi

Gloria Campisi was a pioneering journalist who was among the first female reporters hired at the Daily News. She passed away on Aug. 10, 2017 at age 75. She is buried next to her parents, Salvatore Campisi and Alyce Hopkins.

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George Ord, Ship Chandler

George Ord, Sr. was born in England in May, 1741 and settled in Southwark. He married Rebecca Lindmeyer on January 17, 1767. They lived in a three-story brick house with a large garden at 784 South Front Street, between Catharine and Clymer Streets. Prior to settling in Philadelphia he was a successful ship captain.

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Captain Lodge Colton, Master’s Mate

By Bob Josuweit

Being a riverfront Church, Gloria Dei has a rich history that involves many people who were involved with maritime related occupations. Captain Lodge Colton was no exception. At the age of 14 he became a mariner on the clipper barque “James Cornor.” (sp. Corner?) He served the CSN being appointed in Baltimore, Maryland. Lodge Colton was a Master’s Mate on the CSS Rappahannch in 1864 and the CSS Shanandoah in 1865. The CSS Shanandoah crossed the equator four times. On April 16, 1868 he was married in Baltimore to Marian Watts. The next year they moved to Philadelphia. Although his service took him to ports of call around the world, they maintained sittings at Gloria Dei from 1870 on. In 1874 they settled in New Orleans. Captain Colton’s ship sailed between New Orleans and Havana, Cuba. In 1880 he became a captain in the Ward Line, making voyages between New York, Cuba, and Mexico. He moved to New York and became a senior captain in 1887.

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John C. Hunterson, Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient

John C. Hunterson was born on August 4, 1841 in Philadelphia.

He entered the Union Army on July 23, 1861, where he was mustered in as a Private in Company B, 3rd Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry. He was awarded the CMOH for his bravery June 5, 1862, a few days after the Battle of Fair Oaks. His citation reads “While under fire, between the lines of the two armies, voluntarily gave up his own horse to an engineer officer whom he was accompanying on a reconnaissance and whose horse had been killed, thus enabling the officer to escape with valuable papers in his possession.”

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Captain Morris Sheer

During the 19th century, Philadelphia’s waterfront was lined with wharves which were operated by numerous shipping lines. Smaller vessels designed for domestic use, called packet boats, carried mail, packages, and a limited number of passengers to major cities across the Eastern seaboard. Morris Sheer, a parishioner at Gloria Dei, was one of the first captains of the line of packets that ran between Philadelphia and Charleston.

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Alexander Wilson, Father of Ornithology

Alexander Wilson was born on July 6, 1766, in Paisley, Scotland. At the age of 13 he apprenticed in the weaving trade spending ten years as a weaver. He then began traveling about Scotland as a peddler and writing dialect poems, which he published. Discouraged by poverty and by political persecution because of some satires he wrote, he immigrated to America
in 1794.

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