Sophia Fisler

By Michael Schreiber

Sophia was a younger unmarried sister of Hannah Collin. Their grandparents, Felix and Barbara, emigrated from Switzerland in 1730, and settled in New Jersey, along the Delaware River. Their parents, Jacob Fisler and Sophia Klein, were children on board the same ship. Sophia Klein’s parents, so the story goes, were killed by the ship captain for their money. The Fislers then paid her fare, so she would not be sold as an indentured servant. Fourteen years later, Jacob Fisler & Sophia Klein married.

Sarah J. Fosque (1828-1903)

“Mrs. Sarah J. Fosque, aged seventy-five years, died suddenly at the Virginia Home for Incurables Sunday morning about 5 o’clock.  She was subject to heart attacks and this disease as the cause of her demise.  A few moments before she died she rang the bell for a nurse and told her when she came that she wanted the doctor at once.  Before he could get down the steps she was dead.

The remains were shipped yesterday to Philadelphia, where she was born and had a number of relatives.  She married Captain William F. Fosque, of Accomac County, and survived him several years.  She possessed considerable property at the time of her death and was by no means a charity patient at home.  She was a staunch but very liberal minded Episcopalian, frequently, when in better health, attending Methodist camp-meetings and taking great interest in the work of all denominations.  She thought Easter the choicest day on the calendar and this was the day of her death.”

Source: “Obituary.” Richmond Times 14 April 1903: 2. Print.

Alexander Wilson, Father of Ornithology (1766-1831)

Alexander Wilson was born on July 6, 1766, in Paisley, Scotland. At the age of 13 he apprenticed in the weaving trade spending ten years as a weaver. He then began traveling about Scotland as a peddler and writing dialect poems, which he published. Discouraged by poverty and by political persecution because of some satires he wrote, he immigrated to America
in 1794.

John Douglass, Ship Captain (1747-1840)

Captain Douglass was born in 1747. Soon after the Battle of Lexington he began his military service. On June 3, 1776, the Continental Congress resolved “that a flying camp be immediately established in the middle colonies.” The definition of the Flying Camp Battalion is a Reservist or a Home Guard. Their duties were to serve and protect citizens of the state in case of an invasion. They acted like a police force guarding barracks and government buildings. For its part, Pennsylvania was called upon to provide a force of some 6,000 men. Delegations of one officer and two enlisted men from each of Pennsylvania’s fifty-three associated battalions met in Lancaster, on July 4, 1776, for the purpose of selecting this force.