John Douglass

John Douglass

Ship Captain (1747—July 8, 1840) Buried at Gloria Dei (Old Swedes’) Captain Douglass was born in 1747. Soon after the Battle of Lexington he began his military service. On June 3, 1776, the Continental Congress resolved “that a flying camp be immediately established in the middle colonies.” The definition of the Flying Camp Battalion is a Reservist or a Home Guard. Their duties were to serve and protect citizens of the state in case of an invasion. They acted like a police force guarding barracks and government buildings. For its part, Pennsylvania was called upon to provide a force of some 6,000 men. Delegations of one officer and two enlisted men from each of Pennsylvania’s fifty-three associated battalions met in Lancaster, on July 4, 1776, for the purpose of selecting this force. Captain Douglass was appointed Captain in the Flying Camp, Company G, on July 3, 1776 by order of the Pennsylvania State Convention. He served in the 11th Pennsylvania Regiment, taking part in the Battle of Brandywine where his regiment took heavy loses and wintered in Valley Forge. He resigned on December 7, 1777. In 1805 he was appointed an alderman of Philadelphia and was elected High Sheriff of the city and county in 1825. His office was located in the west wing of Independence Hall. He married Ann Jones at Christ Church on August 10, 1772. Ann Douglass died on September 22, 1826. Captain Douglass was a chair and cabinet maker. Captain Douglass died on July 8, 1840 at the age of 94 years old. The notice in the Philadelphia Public Ledger on July 10, 1840 is headed “Another Revolutionary Character Gone!” Some content from www.11thpa.org/History.html and http://www.emmitsburg.net/archive_list/articles/history/rev_war/...

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Amandus Johnson

Amandus Johnson

Swedish-American Scholar (1877–1974) Buried at Gloria Dei (Old Swedes’) In 1908, Johnson was one of the co-founders of the Swedish Colonial Society, whose members traced their ancestry to the pre Revolutionary War Swedish colonists. Johnson served as instructor and later assistant professor of Scandinavian Languages at the University of Pennsylvania from 1910 to 1921. After serving as President of the Historical Section of the American Division of the Gothenburg Exhibition in Gothenburg, Sweden, in 1921 Johnson accepted the post of Director of the African Educational Expedition to Angola, during 1922-1924. In the years after the expedition, Johnson published a Kimbundu English Portuguese dictionary and a narrative about his travels. Starting in 1926, Johnson was corresponding secretary of the Swedish American Tercentenary Association which conducted an endowment campaign to celebrate the 300th anniversary of Swedish settlement in North America and to endow the American Swedish Historical Museum. In 1938, Prince Bertil of Sweden dedicated the American Swedish Historical Museum in a celebration which also included the dedication of Fort Christina Park in Wilmington, Delaware. Johnson was museum director and curator from 1928 until 1943. Johnson conducted extensive research both in the United States and in Europe into the Swedish American Colonial period. He wrote numerous books and spoke extensively regarding the subject. He continued to take an active interest in the activities of the American Swedish Historical Museum and the Swedish Colonial Society throughout his life. In 1961, Amandus Johnson was selected by the two Swedish District lodges of the Vasa Order of America to be Swedish-American of the Year.  He is most associated with his epic two volume history The Swedish Settlements on the Delaware 1638- 1664, which was also published in Swedish as Den första svenska kolonien i Amerika...

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Gustavus Hesselius

Gustavus Hesselius

Swedish born painter (1682 – May 25, 1755) Buried at Gloria Dei (Old Swedes’) The leading artist in the mid-Atlantic colonies during the first half of the eighteenth century, in 1712 he arrived in Philadelphia as a trained artist. For several years after 1719 or 1720, he lived in Maryland but then returned permanently to Philadelphia. In addition to portraits, his chief subjects, he is known to have painted religious scenes, which number among the earliest colonial examples. Similarly, his two surviving mythological subjects may have been the earliest classical works executed in North America. Born in Falun, Sweden, Hesselius lived in also Folkarna and Uppsala before spending several months in London on his way to America. Quite remarkably for their time, his best portraits transcend physical description to capture the individual personalities of his sitters. In 1735 he painted bust-length images of the careworn Delaware Indian chiefs Tishcohan and Lapowinsa (both Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia), who had come to Philadelphia to negotiate a land dispute. Thought to be the first objective renderings of America’s indigenous peoples, these dignified portrayals capture an inner life as well as respectfully observed details of physiognomy and costume. About five years later, Hesselius painted unostentatious half-length pendants of himself and his wife, Lydia (both Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia), in middle age. His thoughtful visage reflects the character of a man known to have been devoutly religious, as well as interested in science and music. As she alertly appraises the viewer, his visibly intelligent and warmhearted spouse gives a hint of a mischievous smile. Probably no other painter in the colonies at this time could so effectively have rendered a fleeting expression. Hesselius was apparently inactive as a painter after about 1750, perhaps entering retirement so his son could take over the...

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